Pink color lowers Heart rate and reduces aggression

Drunk Tank Pink is a tone of pink claimed to reduce hostile, violent or aggressive behavior.




In the late 1960s, Alexander Schauss, Director of Life Sciences at the American Institute for Biosocial Research in Tacoma, Washington, did studies on psychological and physiological responses to the color pink. Schauss had read studies by the Swiss psychiatrist Max Luscher, who believed that color preferences provided clues about one's personality. Luscher noticed that color preferences shifted according to psychological and physiological fluctuations in his patients. Luscher asserted that color choice reflects emotional states. He theorized that one's color choices reflect corresponding changes in the endocrine system, which produces hormones.

In early tests in 1978, Schauss observed that color, surprisingly, did affect muscle strength, either invigorating or enervating the subject, and even influenced the cardiovascular system. Schauss began to experiment on himself, with the help of his research assistant John Ott. Amazingly, he discovered that a particular shade of pink had the most profound effect. He labeled this tone of pink P-618. Schauss noted that by merely staring at an 18 × 24 inch card printed with this color, especially after exercising, there would result "a marked effect on lowering the heart rate, pulse and respiration as compared to other colors."

In 1979, Schauss managed to convince the directors of a Naval correctional institute in Seattle, Washington to paint some prison confinement cells pink in order to determine the effects this might have on prisoners. Schauss named the color after the Naval correctional institute directors, Baker and Miller. Baker-Miller Pink is now the official name of the paint whose color has the following RGB code: R: 255, G: 145, B: 175.
At the correctional facility, the rates of assault before and after the interior was painted pink were monitored. According to the Navy's report, "Since the initiation of this procedure on 1 March 1979, there have been no incidents of erratic or hostile behavior during the initial phase of confinement". Only fifteen minutes of exposure was enough to ensure that the potential for violent or aggressive behavior had been reduced, the report observed

src Wiki

Also read the book - Drunk Tank Pink

In this interview the author talks about how the University of Iowa's famous football coach Hayden Fry was a psychology major before he got into coaching. And he had the visitors' locker room painted drunk tank pink at Iowa, and to this day it remains somewhat of a part of his legacy that he did this, and Bo Schembechler from Michigan used to cover the walls with newspaper to avoid the psychological effects of it on the football teams.

In one experiment with Mr. California, who was a weightlifter, and he was lifting very heavy weight quite comfortably. As soon as they held up this pink cardboard in front of him, he couldn't lift it anymore. And to snap him out of it, they had to show him a blue piece of cardboard, which undid the effect.


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